IMPROVING CONTAINER SHIPPING SECURITY
Rotterdam Hilton, Feb 4-5 2003
SUMMARY
Improving security in container shipping, the biggest security vulnerabilities, the most effective technologies, existing and expected legislative requirements and the question of costs

CLICK FOR:
Highlights - List of speakers - Conference summary - How to book - Exhibition opportunities - Program day one - Program day two - About Tim Power, conference producer


HIGHLIGHTS
* Scanners, seals, tracking devices, data networks and document management and communication tools - which can do the most to improve security in container shipping

* Pressures the container shipping is under from regulatory agencies in the US and Europe

* How the costs of improving security can best be managed

* Identifying the biggest vulnerabilities in the container shipping supply chain


Register now for Improving container shipping security to ensure that you are kept up to date with the latest legislation, technologies and industry opinion about making improvements in the container shipping supply chain.

Which improvements are necessary, which improvements are required by legislators, where are the biggest vulnerabilities and what technologies and methods can do the most to improve security.

Hear from people with first hand experience with scanners, tags and tracking devices about how effective these technologies are in improving security and whether the improvements justify the cost.

Hear from government officials from the US and European Union about policy to improve and enforce security measures, as well as perspectives from shippers and the insurance sectors about the implications of security measures on their business.

Network with other container shipping security professionals to discuss privately your opinions and experiences into how security can best be improved and the magnitude of the threat.

If you are involved in the container shipping supply chain then attendance of Improving Container Shipping Security is an ideal way to ensure that you are right up to date.



PREFER TO READ PAPER?
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD A ONE PAGE BROCHURE AND BOOKING FORM http://www.thedigitalship.com/pdf/securityconf.pdf


SPEAKERS INCLUDE
DICK MCCORMICK , VP business risk international, Pinkertons
CAPTAIN MIKE EGAN, DIRECTOR OF US HOMELAND SECURITY FOR INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION, SYSTEM PLANNING CORPORATION
JOHN EDWARDS, NETWORK SECURITY AND COMPLIANCE OFFICER, BRITISH AIRWAYS WORLD CARGO
DAVID HOPPS,
MANAGING DIRECTOR, TAG 24

BRYAN EVANS,
US CUSTOMS ATTACHE TO THE PORT OF ROTTERDAM
ALEXANDER WIEDOW,
DIRECTOR, EUROPEAN COMMISSION TAXATION AND CUSTOMS DIRECTORATE
MARK MCGLADE, MANAGING DIRECTOR EUROPE, MIDDLE EAST AND AFRICA, SAVI
KARL BOHMAN,
CEO ALLSET TRACKING
ASHLEY SKAANILD,
REGIONAL DIRECTOR, GT NEXUS
PETER VYVYAN-ROBINSON,
CEO, TRI-MEX
PHIL BEHENNA, SENIOR VP SALES, INTERNATIONAL ASSET SYSTEMS
VICTOR ORPHAN,
SENIOR VP CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT, SAIC
NICOLETTE VAN DER JAGT, SECRETARY GENERAL, EUROPEAN SHIPPERS COUNCIL
SAM IGNARSKI,
WAVY LINE
TIM POWER,
POWER PROJECT RESOURCES (moderator and conference producer)

SUMMARY

Whilst everybody agrees on the need to improve container shipping security, the industry is divided over the best way to achieve it and who should pay.

Where are the biggest vulnerabilities in the container shippling supply chain? Is the right solution advanced warning of shipments to customs, Or is it the responsibility of ports to enforce security, using cargo scanners, container seals, tracking devices and gate security systems?

Following our successful conference "Virtual Box" looking at how IT is integrating the container shipping community (click HERE to read the report), Digital Ship is holding a two day event in Rotterdam in Feb 4-5 2003 to discuss the issues in depth. If you work in the container shipping industry you will find this event invaluable to learn about the latest opinion and participate in the discussion.

CLICK FOR
: Highlights - List of speakers - Conference summary - How to book - Exhibition opportunities - Program day one - Program day two - About Tim Power, conference producer


HOW TO BOOK
Delegate tickets are charged at just GBP 595,
/ Euro 931 / USD 940 for the two day event, which is 40 per cent cheaper than prices many of our competitors charge for similar events. We also offer a 10 per cent discount to bookings received before Christmas 2002.

Book by e-mailing Rebecca Clarkson on clarkson@thedigitalship.com,
Click here to book online
Alternatively phone Karl Jeffery in London on (+44 207) 510 4935.

EXHIBITION STANDS
We have limited options for exhibition stands, the price is GBP 1,500 (Euro 2345) to exhibit for two days, including two delegate tickets. We also have opportunities for lunch and evening dinner sponsorship. Contact us to discuss the possibilities further.

CLICK FOR: Highlights - List of speakers - Conference summary - How to book - Exhibition opportunities - Program day one - Program day two - About Tim Power, conference producer


CONFERENCE PROGRAM DAY ONE

CONFERENCE MODERATOR: Tim Power of Power Project Resources (ex P&O Nedlloyd and International Asset Systems) tjpower@attglobal.net

Session one theme: Supply chain vulnerability and its consequences


9.00 Supply chain vulnerability - where are the weak points and what can you do about them?
Dick McCormick, VP business risk international, Pinkertons
This review of the global supply chain will look at where the key areas of vulnerability are and identify those areas where the international trading community needs to concentrate its security efforts

9.30 What is the economic threat?
Speaker: to be announced
A recent simulation estimates that, at current preparedness levels, a "dirty bomb" attack through the ports could cost U.S. businesses $58 billion. We look at this and the economic implications of new security measures.

10.00 Lessons from smuggling and container crime
David Hopps, head of physical security and crisis management, Tag 24
Smuggling is big business. Wherever there is a price difference or a shortage of supply someone will attempt to smuggle goods in. The vast numbers of containers and products shipped throughout the world gives the smuggler a ready vehicle in which to hide his wares.

We will look at the lessons learned from tracking smuggled and counterfeit goods and discuss whether they can be applied to protecting nations from the threat of weapons of mass destruction delivered through container distribution.

10.30 What lessons can we learn from airfreight?
John Edwards, Network Safety and Compliance Manager, British Airways World Cargo

11.00 COFFEE

Session two : The role of technology in securing the supply chain

11.30 Securing shippers
Marcus Hallside, Maintenance Systems (Invited)
How does industry make sure that weapons are not being packed into containers at origin? What programmes are being put in place to ensure greater security at this vulnerable link in the supply chain?

12.00 Securing ports
Peter Zint, Hamburg Port Consultancy
Ports worldwide are under enormous pressure to join security programmes, but what is really needed to create a secure port and what will work in practice?

12.30 Panel discussion: how much can technology contribute to solving these problems?

1.00 LUNCH


Session three : Supply chain data and its role in security

2.30 Securing containers in transit: e-seals
Karl Bohman, CEO, All Set Tracking
e-seals are being put forward as a key element in future trade security. We ask How can e-seals contribute to secure trade lanes and "safe commerce"? Are they commercially viable? What are the side benefits for users? What performance standards for seals are being developed? What needs to be done in terms of testing to set those standards?

3.00 Securing containers in transit: satellite tracking and movements on land
Peter Vyvyan-Robinson, CEO, Tri-Mex
Detecting crime and accessing police across borders Movement of containers in large hinterlands like Europe and the USA adds to security risk. We look at how satellite tracking and links to police forces can contribute.

3.30 The container of the future
Phil Behenna, senior vice president of sales, International Asset Systems
The modern ISO container is a relatively simple metal box. How could it be adapted, or equipped with hardware/technologies for security purposes in the future?

4.00 Technology in action: Smart and Secure Tradelanes
Mark McGlade, managing director Europe, Middle East and Africa, Savi
Smart and Secure Tradelanes is a major US-led initiative involving ports and technology providers. We look at what it has achieved.

4.30 TEA

5.00 Container scanning: how does it work, what can it do?
Victor Orphan, senior VP corporate development, SAIC
A key element in future security will be the inspection of containers at port of origin using nuclear portal monitors and gamma-ray or x-ray imaging systems. We look at how these work and what they can deliver.

5.30 PANEL DISCUSSION How much more secure do these technologies make the supply chain? UK Customs,
Dick McCormick, VP business risk international, Pinkertons, Victor Orphan, senior VP corporate development, SAIC, Karl Bohman, CEO, All Set Tracking

6.00 Alcoholic beverage, close

CLICK FOR:
Highlights - List of speakers - Conference summary - How to book - Exhibition opportunities - Program day one - Program day two - About Tim Power, conference producer


CONFERENCE PROGRAM DAY TWO

9.00 Data provision: can the portals help?
Ashley Skaanild, regional director, GT Nexus
Carrier portals are improving the efficiency of data collection from shippers and are becoming significant data repositories in their own right. How can they contribute to improved security?

9.30 Data: how can you make it useful and available?
Mark McGlade, managing director Europe, Middle East and Africa, Savi
Getting security data in the right format and making it available to the people who need it quickly and reliably is vital. What steps are being taken to achieve this?

10.00 Data analysis tools
Ian Black, Autonomy

10.30 BREAK

11.00 Current security initiatives from the US
Bryan Evans, US Customs Attache to the Port of Rotterdam
US Customs has been very active in driving new security initiative. We review the progress made by C-TPAT and CSI.

11.30 European Union response to US security initiatives
Alexander Wiedow, director, European Commission Taxation and Customs Directorate
Security affects Europe too. How is the European Union responding?

12.00 Security in practise
Capt Mike Egan, director of US Homeland Security for Intermodal Transportation, System Planning Corporation
We review real-life examples of how supply chain security threats have been detected and dealt with. What can we learn for the future?

12.30 LUNCH

Session: security costs

Security is not free. What are the practical implications for shippers, ports and lines? Are the optimists right to say that security initiatives will drive new supply chain efficiencies or is security going to add to costs (and if it does, who pays?)?

2.00 the shipping line's perspective
Speaker : to be announced

2.30 Security costs: the shipper's perspective
Nicolette van der Jagt, secretary general, European Shippers Council


3.00 Security costs: the port's perspective
speaker: to be announced

3.30 Liability and insurance implications
Sam Ignarski, consulant, Wavelength Insurance
The costs of a supply chain security breach could be colossal. What are the implications for liability and insurance?

4.00 PANEL DISCUSSION Costs and who pays?

4.30 CLOSE : ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE

TIM POWER

Conference producer Tim Power has worked for 20 years in container shipping and supply chain management. With P&O Containers he had roles in container logistics and trade lane management before joining the company's new Global Logistics division in 1995.

There he ran the UK operation which provided supply chain management, project cargo, airfreight and consolidation services. He left P&O Containers in 1998 and joined International Asset Systems as one of the start up team that developed and launched InterBox a B2B exchange for container interchange. In 2001 he set up his own company, specialising in e-business, supply chain engineering and container logistics.

©Digital Ship Ltd. 2003